Head to Head Round Tables: Bold Bases and Circular Surfaces

Isabella Prisco
·2 minuto per la lettura
Photo credit: Thomas Pagani
Photo credit: Thomas Pagani

From ELLE Decor

The architecture of a table is at the center of reflections in new design projects presented this year. The investigations of designers unfold in increasingly distinct forms which, despite their compact volumes and light weight, controvert any expressive and materialistic irrelevance. In creating dining or office tables, the search for original geometries passes from maximizing large scenic compositions to subtle unique bases under wood or lacquered tops. It’s details, once again, that make the difference: while new additions seem to declare the success of the sculpture-table as a central element of the living area or workstation, signature articulations are identified in the minutiae lending this object its singularity. Here then, we explore a head to head challenge of round tables to be observed from the bottom up: the NVL Table by Mdf Italia and Manto by Gallotti&Radice.

Photo credit: Thomas Pagani
Photo credit: Thomas Pagani

NVL Table is the second project, after Super_Position, signed by Jean Novel for Mdf Italia, taking the name quite literally. To set the French designer’s new single-material design apart are the geometric rigor of profiles and the dryness of volumes. In its architectural forms, the table, which is perfectly paired to residential, contract or working contexts — like managerial offices and meeting rooms, encouraging the exchange of ideas between diners and colleagues — stands out with its overall lightness. The top surface, which appears subtle and solid at the same time, seems to float above the base, which is constructed around two symmetrical supports, realizing a unique geometric composition of full and empty spaces recalling the principle of trilith. Lacquered, polished or opaque, NVL Table is available in reconstructed marble or cement.

Photo credit: Courtesy Photo Gallotti&Radice
Photo credit: Courtesy Photo Gallotti&Radice

Highlighting the materiality of wood, meanwhile, is the new dining table from Gallotti&Radice. It’s called Manto and, as its name would suggest, the base recalls the enveloping gesture of a soft wool cape closed at the neck by an elegant satin brass button. Like a collar, the support that holds up the circular top seems to twist around itself in an evolutionary composition with a subtle graphic mark. Designed by Pietro Russo, Manto is realized with a top in “Colore” Frisè Walnut herringbone wood inlay and a black bevelled edge. Other colors and materials are available, like that in dark grey Frisé Maple or white Frisè Tanganika with a bevelled edge in the same finish.

Photo credit: Courtesy Photo Gallotti&Radice
Photo credit: Courtesy Photo Gallotti&Radice